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Elementary - Weekly Word Study

 

Week of October 10, 2016

Principle: The Long e sound can be spelled ea as in deal, ee as in speed,
and ie as in field.


Season
Wheat
Jeans
Squeal
Peach
Queen
Thirteen
Squeeze
Screech
Committee
Achieve
Belief
Chief
Field
Priest




Week of October 10, 2016

Principle: The Long a sound can be spelled a as in lady, ai in aim, and ay as in today.

Stake
Mane
Grateful
Waste
Amaze
Escape
Translate
Waist
Complain
Maintain
Remain
Contain
Obtain
Afraid
Thursday
Dismay
Portray
Delay
Essay
Away
Pray

 




Week of April 11, 2016

Principle: If the word ends in s, x, z, ch, or sh, the plural is usually formed by adding 'es.' This is because when you add an 's' to the end of these words, you have to add an extra syllable to the word in order to pronounce it.

Arches
Atlases
Axes
Bashes
Biases
Canvases
Compasses
Equinoxes
Fetches
Lashes
Patches
Sketches
Twitches
Radishes
Quizes

 

 


Week of March 21, 2016

Principle: Some words have a vowel, a consonant and a silent e. The vowel sound is usually the name of the vowel like a in make, e in Pete, I in ride and u in cute.
 
Hope
Slope
Globe
Mope
Note
Tote
Cane
Pane
Made
Mane
Ate
Hate
Rate
Cape
Cute
Cube
Bite
Shine
Kite
Slime
Time
Fine
Pine

  


Week of March 14, 2016

Principle: Homophones are words that are pronounced the same but have different meanings and are spelled differently.

To / Too / Two
Their / They're / There
You / You're
Which / Witch
Break / Brake
Wood / Would
Patience / Patients
Its / It's
Our / Hour
Threw / Through
New / Knew
Close / Clothes
Piece / Peace
Whether / Weather
Aloud / Allowed

 


Week of March 7, 2016

Principle: The ending -tion is added to a word and is pronounced shun.
Many times the suffix tion changes a verb to a noun. For example, the
verb act changes to the noun action.

action
subtraction
mention
contraction
fiction
location
station
friction
nation
addition
direction
definition
lotion
population
election
explanation
multiplication

 


Week of February 29, 2016

Principle: Words that end in the suffix "ed" are in the past tense.
Sometimes "d" makes the /d/ sound as in showed, the /ed/ sound as in
added, or the /t/ sound as in walked.

landed
focused
directed
ended
melted
delivered
dressed
backed
offered
tricked
discovered
screamed
helped
explained
truste

 

 


Week of February 8, 2016

Principle: When G is followed by letters other than e, I, or y, it usually makes a hard /G/ sound as in goat.

Governor
Gravy
Gargle
Gamble
Garbage
Gather
Glacier
Garden
Gulf
Magnificent

  

 


Week of February 1, 2016

Principle: When G is followed by I, e, or y is usually makes the /J/
sound as in gym and can be spelled g or ge.

gem
giraffe
giant
region
gentle
gigantic

 

 


Week of January 25, 2016

Principle: When C is followed by the letters a, or o, it makes the /k/
sound you hear in come.

career
cabin
cousin
common
hurricane
coast
cause

 

 


Week of January 18, 2016

Principle: When c is followed by i, e, or y I makes the /s/ sound as in city.

advice
receive
twice
circle
bicycle
produce
citizen
decide
cemetery

 


Week of January 11, 2016

Principle: The letters ear, er, ir, and ur can all stand for the vowel
sound you hear in perk.

earning
circus
earthquake
disturb
furnish
third
nervous
observe
registered
current
shirt
occur
heard
birthday
heart

 


Week of January 4, 2016

Principle: The letters ar together usually stand for the vowel sound you
hear in star. The letters or stand for the sound you hear in fork.


Harvest
Sort
Normal
Ornament
Partner
Remark
Argue
Organize
Enormous
Carpenter
Absorb
Kindergarten
Charge
Marvelous
Porch